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Covid 19 cases in Waverley

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Keep track of the number of Covid-19 cases arising locally. This will give an indication of how relaxation of lockdown is affecting the spread of the disease in our area.

Cases for Waverley are published by the UK government, see the website coronavirus.data.gov.uk  Data is updated on a daily basis.

Historical data is listed below to show the current trend. The method of counting cases has been changed on several occasions, most recently on 16 November. The chart of weekly cases shows figures adjusted to this latest method of counting cases.

 

Weekly Covid-19 cases 28 November

For the week ending Saturday 21 November, this amounts to 90 new cases in Waverley  per 100,000 head of population. For the whole of England, in the week to 22 November there were 251 new cases per 100,000.

Date                      Total number of cases        % of population*

1  December                    1650                                         1.31

30  November                  1640

29  November                  1637

28  November                  1626

27  November                  1617

26  November                  1608

25  November                  1593

24  November                  1569

23  November                  1550

22  November                  1530

21  November                  1514

20  November                  1498

19  November                  1486

18  November                  1473

17  November                  1465

16  November                  1435

16   November  Change to method of counting cases 

15  November                  1548

14  November                  1524

13  November                  1508

12  November                  1486

11  November                  1445

10  November                  1411

9   November                   1400

8   November                   1368

7   November                   1350

6   November                   1334

5   November                   1312

5   November   Nationwide lockdown to last until 2 December

4   November                   1297

3   November                   1276

2   November                   1250

1   November                   1227

31 October                       1209

30 October                       1185

29 October                       1153

28 October                       1128

27 October                       1104

26 October                       1080

25 October                       1056

24 October                       1036

23 October                       1006

22 October                        988

21 October                        968

20 October                        947

19 October                        924

18 October                        906

17 October                        891

16 October                        857

15 October                        846

14 October                        820

C13 October                        801

12 October                        774

11 October                        768

10 October                        755

9 October                          737

8 October                          717

7 October                          702

6 October                          681

5 October                          667

4 October                          651

3 October                          625

2 October                          620

1 October                          618

30 September                   614

29 September                   611

28 September                   603

27 September                   597

26 September                   593

25 September                   590

24 September                   579

23 September                   569

22 September                   564

21 September                   559

20 September                   558

19 September                   558

18 September                   556

17 September                   554

16 September                   554

15 September                   553

14 September                   550

14 September  Groups restricted to 6 people

13 September                   550

12 September                   550

11 September                   546

10 September                   543

9 September                     541

8 September                     535

7 September                     530

6 September                     527

5 September                     524

4 September                     523

3 September                     521

2 September                     520

1 September                     519

1 September  Schools reopen

31 August                          514

30 August                          504

29 August                          504

28 August                          501

27 August                          501

26 August                          498

25 August                          496

24 August                          493

23 August                          491

22 August                          491

21 August                          487

20 August                          484

19 August                          481

18 August                          480

17 August                          478

16 August                          476

15 August                          475

15 August  Casinos and indoor theatres reopen

14 August                          475

13 August                          473

12 August                          473

10 August                          472

09 August                          472

08 August                          472

07 August                          472

06 August                          472

05 August                          471

04 August                          471

03 August                          471

02 August                          471

01 August                          471

31 July                               471

30 July                               471

29 July                               469

28 July                               467

27 July                               466

26 July                               466

25 July                               465

25 July    Indoor gyms and pools reopen

24 July                               464

23 July                               463

22 July                               463

21 July                               463

20 July                               463

19 July                               462

18 July                               461

17 July                               457

16 July                               456

15 July                               456

14 July                               456

13 July                               456

13 July    Beauty salons reopen

12 July                               456

11 July                               456

11 July    Outdoor swimming pools, outdoor theatres reopen

10 July                               455

09 July                               454

08 July                               454

07 July                               454

06 July                               452

05 July                               452

04 July                               452

04 July    Pubs and hairdressers reopen

03 July                               452

02 July                               451

02 July    Revised method of counting cases

01 July                               308

30 June                              308

29 June                              308

28 June                              308

27 June                              308

26 June                              308

25 June                              308

24 June                              307

23 June                              307

22 June                              307

21 June                              307

20 June                              307

19 June                              307

18 June                              306

17 June                              306

16 June                              305

15 June                              305

15 June       Non essential shops open

14 June                              305

13  June                             305

13 June     Social bubbles for 2 households allowed

12 June                              305

11 June                              305

10 June                              304

9 June                                304                                         0.24

1 June        Schools reopen to selected years

13 May      Some businesses (including Garden centres) reopen

* The Office of National Statistics (ONS) estimated the population of Waverley in mid 2019 as 126,328.

On 18 October, the corresponding percentage figure for South East England was 0.62%, for London 0.8%.

 

Waverley Local Plan Part 2

WBC LPP2

Waverley Borough Council (WBC) has announced a public consultation on Part 2 of the new Local Plan, and is inviting your comments.

You may recall that the Local Plan Part 1, dealing with Strategic Policies and Sites, was adopted by the Council on 20 February 2018.

Part 2 deals with Site Allocations and Development Management Policies. It contains policies that will be used when making decisions on planning applications. It also allocates additional sites for housing in parts of the Borough, reviews the boundaries of our town centres and local landscape designations, and allocates sites for gypsy and traveller accommodation.

Parts 1 and 2 together will replace the Waverley Borough Local Plan (2002). Local Plan

WBC is now conducting a consultation on Part 2 before it is submitted to the Secretary of State next year for examination. Comments from residents are invited before the closing date of Friday 29 January 2021.

Local Plan Part 2 and other submission documents, including the representation form, can be viewed and downloaded via the Council’s website at www.waverley.gov.uk/LPP2

Hard copies of the documents are available for viewing by appointment only at the Council Offices, The Burys, Godalming, GU7 1HR, telephone 01483 523333.

Waverley will make alternative arrangements for residents who cannot view the documents online, and cannot travel to Godalming during the current pandemic. Contact WBC on 01483 523333 to discuss alternative arrangements.

 

Farnham Pollution Summit anniversary

Comment exhaust image

The Pollution Summit held on October 25th 2019 and organised by the Farnham Herald and Jeremy Hunt, was seen by some as a political stunt, but in fact was the catalyst for real dialog on this matter between senior Surrey CC and Waverley BC officers and Councillors, perhaps for the first time.

Comment summit image 2019

The actions needed to resolve Farnham’s high air pollution problems have been known for many years, indeed Waverley BC’s own Air Quality Management Plan published in 2008 stated that reduction in traffic flow through central Farnham by part pedestrianisation would be the best remedy. However, the fact that Waverley BC has no power or budget to do what it had proposed, taken together with the lack of political will at all levels, has meant that there has been no significant action so far.

The Farnham Society has, in the past, been highly critical of Waverley Borough Council in its incompetence in monitoring air quality but we are glad to say that these issues have now been resolved with rapid publication of valid air quality data available online to everyone.

None of us were to know when the pollution summit took place in October last year, the enormous changes which were to unfold in 2020 with the onslaught of the Corona Virus. Traffic volumes across the country plummeted and so did the amount of air pollution, certainly in terms of Nitrogen Dioxide (NO) concentrations. In Farnham, NO concentrations fell by 50% between January 2020 and May during the lockdown period but have of course increased as traffic has returned since but, significantly, not to the pre lockdown levels. This may be due to lower overall traffic volumes, although nationally volumes are almost back to where they were, but more likely to the lane restrictions which have controversially been introduced in Farnham since the summer. This points to the potential value of restricting lanes so as to reduce pollution even when this leads to slower moving traffic.

Comment South Street image

Another aspect which has been highlighted by the lockdown is the fact that Particulate Matter PM₁₀ concentrations (measured continuously by the automatic monitor at the Royal Deer Junction) show no similar changes to NO concentrations. In fact, there seems to have been little effect on PM ₁₀ concentrations, so it is clear that traffic volumes in Farnham are not the critical factor.

Looking forward, it is obvious that Farnham will not breach any government pollution guidelines this year as these are mostly based on annual mean numbers which in Farnham will all be well below the Air Quality Standards regulations. Beyond that who knows? Given that the number of diesel cars (the worst polluters) being sold has fallen so dramatically from 50% of all cars in 2016 to only 15% this year and that electric and hybrid cars are now selling in similar numbers to diesel, the effect on NO levels must surely come soon.

In any event, the changes to traffic flows as a result of the proposed wide-ranging Farnham Infrastructure Programme, will have a major beneficial effect not only on pollution levels but on the entire environment of the town. There will of course also be problems which result from these changes, one of the important ones being the effect on the Upper Hale Road congestion. However overall, we support many of the proposals which have been tabled but we do worry about the availability of funds to carry the ambitious programme to completion. The Project Board seems to be working well and is reaching out to all stakeholders in and around the town including business and retail which will be much affected by the changes.

For the first time that many of us can remember, there does seem to be a concerted effort by all tiers of local government to work together and to engage with us all in finding a good solution. Political attitudes across the country have changed on environmental and healthy living issues and this must surely be welcome.

John Slater

Chair of the Air Quality Committee

 

Shepherd and Flock conservation area

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Waverley Borough Council (WBC) has announced a proposal to create a Shepherd and Flock conservation area.

In the 1970s, the Shepherd and Flock roundabout was constructed, enclosing the Shepherd and Flock pub and surrounding houses, cutting them of from the rest of Farnham. WBC propose to designate the area thus enclosed as a conservation area.

Access to the area is by vehicle from the roundabout; on foot via a pedestrian underpass (both from the west); and from Moor Park Lane from the east.

In the late 19th century, the Shepherd and Flock pub stood at what was then the junction of the Farnham to Guildford road, and Moor Park Lane. The former ran from Farnham past Bourne Mill (as it still does), then east up onto the Hogs Back along the route of the Pilgrim’s Way. Moor Park Lane followed the River Wey south eastwards past Mother Ludlam’s Cave to Moor Park House. The lane was used as an access route from Waverley Abbey to Bourne Mill, in the days when it was a working mill.

Moor_Park_Lane,_Farnham

Moor Park estate extended from Moor Park House as far as the proposed conservation area. The 19th century gate lodge to the estate still stands, next to the bridge where the A31 now passes over Moor Park Lane.

Moor Park Lodge pix

In 1897, the landowner tried to close the lane at that point. Farnham Town Council officials, supported by several hundred local people, forcibly opened the gates in what has become known as the Battle of Moor Park. The lane can still be followed as a public footpath.

As well as the pub and former gate lodge, the area contains two Garde II listed buildings,  and one Building of Local Merit.

Details of the proposed conservation area, along with its history and geography  can be found at:

www.waverley.gov.uk/shepherdandflockcaa

A public consultation runs from 2 October until 13 November.

 

 

 

August updates

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We take a look at what has been happening  in August, with regard to some of  the major  development works in progress or proposed, in and around Farnham.

 

 

Woolmead
Woolmead sheet piling image TFS
A quick update on activity (or lack of it) at the Woolmead site. Work has ceased while Berkeley Homes attempt to change their plans by removing underground car parking space – the local authorities are opposed to the change. Meanwhile steel sheet piling has been delivered from a site in Hull. Sheet piling is used to retain the earth when forming basements. The views reported to come from Berkeley are along the lines of ‘don’t expect anything to happen for up to a year.’ So far Berkeley Homes’ senior management haven’t communicated their intentions to Waverley Borough Council.

Folly Heights

Planning consent was granted for this large housing development at the top of Folly Hill, in spite of opposition from the local authorities and in spite of the site not being included in the Farnham Neighbourhood Plan.Folly Heights roundabout August 2020

Construction has started, with works on the A287 to create access to the development, including a new roundabout. This is for a development of fewer than 100 new houses, yet no roundabout is planned for access to the proposed Coxbridge Farm development with more than 300 houses. Are the developers, CALA, intent on extending the development further to the west across Upper Old Park Lane, to add yet more new houses?

Rowledge

Holt Pound aerial photo TFS

There are proposals for an extra care retirement community in Holt Pound, Rowledge, comprising 121 homes plus communal facilities. For comparison, Hawthorn Lodge (the site of the former police station) has 50 apartments. The proposed development is on the eastern side of the A325, between Wrecclesham and Bird World, in what is now an open field used to graze horses. In the aerial photo above, the A325 is seen running across the top left, Fullers Road runs along the lower edge of the field.  East Hampshire District Council’s Land Availability Assessment, December 2018 has designated the land ‘undevelopable’ stating ‘Residential development would potentially have an adverse impact on the rural character of the area, and is disproportionate in size to the existing settlement. Lack of suitable public transport – particularly to the scarcity of an evening bus service – would lead to a substantial increase in private car use.
Of particular concern is the way the developers are using planning law. The proposal ls for Planning use C2 (Residential Institutions) which covers hospitals, nursing homes, boarding schools, residential colleges and training centres. C2 developments do not attract Community Infrastructure Levy (CIL) for the benefit of the community, for example to upgrade the A325 nearby. The site being in Hampshire would mean that Waverley would not benefit from it in any way, despite the residents using facilities in Farnham and Rowledge.
If you feel that you would like to let the parish council know what you think, you can write to them at Binsted Parish Council, The Sports Pavilion, The Street, Binsted, Alton, Hampshire, GU34 4PB

or email either their Chairman, Ron Neil, at r.neil@binstedparishcouncil.org.uk).
or Susan Hodder clerk@binstedparishcouncil.org.uk

Farnham Infrastructure Programme

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The Farnham Infrastructure Programme (FIP), a collaboration of Surrey County Council with Waverley Borough Council and Farnham Town Council, aims to deliver a single shared vision for the future infrastructure of Farnham.

The Farnham Local Liaison Forum (LLF) has been formed to engage with the local community and local businesses to shape Farnham’s future. The LLF was launched by Webinar on 5 August 2020, with a presentation by representatives of all three councils.

LLF Laptop Screen 2A

 

Click here for slide presentation.

You can watch the 2 hour webinar by clicking on the following link

https://www . youtube . com/watch?v=A45_vmXViHA&feature=youtu . be

For a list of questions raised and answers given at the webinar, click here.

A Farnham Infrastructure Vision Statement has been produced, as a consultation document. Click here to view.

To respond to the consultation click here. Consultation closes 8 November.

 

 

AGM Detailed Planning Reports

The Woolmead

The Western Planning Committee of 15 councillors from Farnham and the former Southern Area unanimously refused the application to reduce the number of car parking spaces within the building’s basement from 141 to 80.

The Society’s planning committee chair asked David Wylde, a long time Society member, one of the ’Brightwells Five’, to speak on behalf of the Society.

A highlight of the meeting was Councillor Dickson drawing the committee’s attention to the fact that Berkeley Homes’ last reported turnover was £1.9 billion and their profit £503 million, yet they were unable to finance the cost of the car parking spaces they were trying to remove from the scheme. Tony Pidgley, Chairman of the Berkeley Homes Group died on Friday 26 June. There is uncertainty about what will happen to the site now.

Farnham Design Statement Review

Planning chair wrote to the five members of the Infrastructure Planning Group on Friday 26 June confirming that the majority of the Planning Committee were entirely dissatisfied and disappointed with the draft Plan as it failed to meet its own objectives, and suggested a pause in the work and a rethink. The planning chair did so reluctantly but said that we must grasp this opportunity to address the numerous shortfalls in the document. The leader of the Group has confirmed that he will respond when they have had a chance to consider all the issues.

Farnham Project Board

The Society have been approached, as a stakeholder, to assist the Surrey County Council appointed traffic consultants. A public consultation document is currently being prepared, time scale unknown.

East Hampshire District Council Local Plan

East Hampshire District Council has identified a site in Whitehill & Bordon for the development of up to 1,300 additional homes in preference to the site at Northbrook Park. However, they have continued to confirm that instead of allocating another large development site in the district, the council intends to identify a ‘broad area of search’ along the A31 corridor.

Brightwells Trees Planning Application

No date has been decided for the western Planning Committee meeting to determine the planning application to vary the condition in the 2016 planning approval to allow the felling and replacement of the three mature trees adjacent to Brightwell House.

Land at Green Lane Farm

Waverley Borough Council served an Enforcement Notice on the landowner week commencing 22 June. The Notice takes effect on Friday 31 July 2020 and has to be complied with within 6 months.

 

AGM 2020

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Due to the current Covid-19 pandemic it was necessary to cancel the 2020 AGM. Because of the lack of clarity as to when group meetings will once again be permitted, it was agreed to hold a virtual AGM. The agenda, minutes of the 2019 AGM, reports and Executive Committee election form can all be found below. Click on the entry to download the document as a PDF.

Voting has been by email, and the results have been circulated to members.

AGM 2020 Agenda

Minutes of the 2019 AGM

Chairman’s Report AGM 2020

Treasurer’s AGM statement 2019_20
Treasurer’s AGM Report 2019-20

AGM Committee Election 2020

Committee Reports

Planning Report AGM 2020
Air Quality Report AGM 2020
Summary Farnham Air Quality Selected sites 2013 — 2019
HODs Report AGM 2020
Visits Report AGM 2020
Talks and Events Report AGM 2020

Planning Update Report AGM 2020

Brightwells: What are we getting ?

20200908_094825

Our planning committee chairman, David Howell, reviews the state of the Brightwells development in September 2020. His review has been published in the 10 September edition of the Farnham Herald and emailed to members in two parts over the weekends of 18/19 and 25/26 of September including more images than had been included in the Herald publication.

September 2020

I’ve been hearing from various quarters that Farnham residents have expressed surprise and bewilderment at the increasing height and dominance of the Brightwells buildings adjoining public spaces, notably on Dogflud Way, East Street and above the Sainsbury’s South Street car park. I thought I would give you a summary of what the development brings.

The Society’s position

The Farnham Society opposed the proposals from inception. We were appalled at the size and scale of the scheme and objected strongly every time the terms of the Crest contract were altered in their favour, for example the decision not to retain the Gostrey Centre on site. But the old Waverley administration continued regardless.

The residents expressed their thoughts about the use of the site through a survey in the Farnham Herald before the Development Brief was prepared in 2000, twenty years ago, but the Brief completely ignored their opinions. In 2016 the Society were involved in launching the campaign to seek a Judicial Review, questioning the viability of the scheme and predicting the lack of take-up of retail space, given current trends in the high street.

Support from both the membership and residents was magnificent and more sympathetic alternatives to the scheme were suggested, all to no avail. The Farnham Theatre Association fought and lost their battle to save the Redgrave Theatre.

But we are where we are, we still dislike the development intensely but want some good to come out of it for the people of Farnham.

Current status

You may not need reminding that Surrey County Council has invested in excess of £50 million in this development. We are paying for it. The current Waverley administration have reported that the borough council will probably never make any money out of it. They have a chance if all the 25 retail units are let as soon as they are available and remain let. To date the only interested parties are M&S Simply Food, Reel Cinemas, Ask Italian and Seasalt. The Society predicted this years ago. The Crest Nicholson brochure boasts 8 restaurants. Are they sustainable in the current climate ?

I haven’t analysed the area of accommodation still available in the development, but my guess is 75% which equates to 72,000 square feet. To put that into perspective, the Argos building has a total area of 7,500 square feet, Water Lane Sainsbury’s 80,000 square feet.

So, where does one start ? The largest building I think, which is D8 and then continue anti-clockwise around the site looking at the buildings visible from the road or public access space.

Brightwells CN Plan 03 09 20

D8, Cinema and car park

This is the largest building within the development and will be visible to anyone, anywhere, in the unfortunate position of having a view of the development. Currently the greatest impact is from Dogflud Way. The building dominates the view for those approaching Farnham town centre from the east. The southern end of the east elevation, illustrated below, is finished with a green ‘living wall’ – an anachronism you may well think.

D8 East Elevation 03 09 20 Green Wall TFS

The building has a footprint larger than the sports centre and about 60% of Sainsbury’s Water Lane. Allowing for its four full floors, together with the lower ground floor car park, the building has approximately three times Sainsbury’s floor space. The capacity of the car park is recorded as 426 over ten levels. Access and egress from the car park is via a ramp from Dogflud Way. I saw overlay drawings several years ago and these showed the edge of the ramp within ten feet of the corner of the sports centre – the length of a classic mini.

D8 East Elevation photo TFS

Photo illustrating progress at the beginning of September

There is a six screen cinema in the building with a current provision of approximately 750 seats although I foresee the possibility of the actual number reducing to accommodate the luxury seats that Reel, the cinema operator, may decide to install. The building also houses no fewer than four retail units or shops most with additional space on the first floor. Ask Italian are currently taking unit RU5 which has first floor space. There are a total of 33 flats within the building.

I have to say that I feel that the west elevation overlooking Brightwell House and Brightwell Gardens is a mess, see below. That’s my opinion. Some may disagree with me. Time will tell.

D8 west elevation photo TFS

D15, Affordable Housing

This is a three storey apartment block housing 15 flats, mainly with 2 bedroom. The flats have been acquired by Metropolitan Thames Valley Housing (MTVH) as affordable housing. The building extends right up to the boundary and dominates the car park serving Chestnuts, East Gate and the Clock House. There is no amenity space to the flats. In my opinion it turns what was a reasonably pleasant, open, car park area into a fish bowl.

D15 west elevation TFS

Elevation drawing and photo illustrating progress at the beginning of September

D6, retail shops and flats

The north elevation of this building sits facing East Street, adjacent to the entrance to the development and opposite the former Marlborough Head pub. Built over four floors it houses 11 retail units on the ground floor some of which have space on the first floor together with 42 flats with an even split between 1 and 2 bedrooms. There is no amenity space. Below a photograph taken earlier in September. The roof section of the building still has to be added so the building will increase in height a further storey. It already dominates the skyline, dwarfing the Marlborough Head.

D6 and The Marlborough Head pub 2

D14 and D1, retail shops and flats

D14 includes the Marlborough Head pub and extends back to connect to D1 forming an L shape arrangement which in turn faces Cambridge Place opposite Funkey Monkey Soft Play. D14 houses four retail units on the ground floor all with potential access to first floor space. Crest’s press releases show Seasalt having taken unit 12, the one adjoining the Marlborough Head. This stretch of the development is two storey and, I have to admit, is in keeping with the retained pub structure in height.

D1 D6 East Street Elevation drawing TFS

Elevation drawing of D1 and D16 on East Street

D1 is three storeys in its entirety with the ground floor providing three shop units. The first and second floors house a total of 16 flats, with an equal split between one and two bedrooms, the latter on the south side having views over the new ‘town square’. The wall finishes are a real mish-mash, brickwork, painted render, slate hanging and timber boarding. Sorry, but it isn’t pretty, see below.

D1 South Elevation TFS

D21, retail units

This two storey building has shop windows on all unattached elevations at ground floor level being fully glazed on the east side overlooking the ‘town square’. The rear faces Cambridge Place. Planning application drawings indicate a square vented chimney feature on the zinc pitched roof. Probably one of the more attractive buildings on the development in my opinion although probably better suited as a pavilion or sea front located building. Five retail units are allocated to it.

D20, M&S and flats

M&S Simply Food will occupy the whole of the ground floor of this building. There is a smaller, so called, mezzanine area which sits above part of the M&S space to the south. From recollection this was the space that the Gostrey Centre was going to occupy or was included in their space. The north, east and south sides of the buildings are three or four storeys high around a residents’ shared amenity space at first floor floor level which looks west overlooking the Sainsbury’s upper car park deck, see below.

D20 west elevation cropped

The building houses a total of 42 flats, a majority two bedroomed but with a couple of three bedroomed dwellings which extend up to the third floor. The four storey parts of the west elevation totally dominate the skyline when you are in the car park. The building dwarfs the neighbouring Victoria Gardens, see below, the overlooking windows destroying its former feeling of calm and privacy.

D20 south elevation from Victoria Garden TFS

The west elevation will have a couple of brick finished chimneys trying to add a sense of domestic scale. The planning application plan drawing shows four lovely mature trees in the amenity space, which are in fact not shown on the landscaped west elevation.

D20 east elevation, tented B House

Photo illustrating progress of the east elevation from the temporary bridge in September

D4B and D4C

As far as I can see these two buildings aren’t visible above the hoardings yet. Both are designated as purely residential. D4B houses a total of 39 flats, 14 one bedroom, 18 two bedroom and 7 three bedroom. The four storey building will tower above the 40 Degreez building, and the sports centre glazed west elevation which provides light to the swimming pool. Several of the upper floor east facing flats have balconies, further compromising the youth club, see drawing elevation below. The building is finished with a mix of brickwork and painted render. Managing the building maintenance will be an interesting exercise.

D4B East elevation TFS

D4C is similarly a four storey building housing 34 flats, 5 one bedroom, 19 two bedroom and 10 three bedroom. The main feature of the west facing elevation, see below, is a simplified Jacobean Dutch style gable. I ask myself, what were they thinking ?

D4C west elevation

D4A

The last but one of the buildings, this sits away from the existing perimeter of the site, as yet not visible from outside the site. Four storey’s high, housing one restaurant space and 16 flats over the four floors including two flats on the ground floor. Am I alone in thinking that the west elevation of the building is totally out of place, with pink painted render, elevation drawing below, probably more at home in Italy. The building boasts another square vented chimney feature.

D4A west elevation 03 09 20

Brightwell House, designated building number D12

A Grade II listed building which the former Waverley administration tried to demolish. Smallest building on the site although it is being extended with an appalling two storey extension to the north side, see east elevation below. The building is currently ‘tented’. I am told it is being re-rendered and refurbished to the highest of standards. We will see. It will be dwarfed by the buildings that surround it. I recall reading somewhere that it was seen as a centrepiece. In my experience you don’t surround your most treasured article with vast over-dominant other things.

D12 Brightwell House east elevation 03 09 20

The Farnham Society

We have a membership in excess of 650 – more than many other civic societies throughout the country. Our aim is to protect our town’s heritage while taking an active part in shaping its future. The scale of our membership is important for the impact it has on the different authorities and organisations we speak to, and it does make a difference. Thank you for being one of those members if you are. If not, why not join us. Explore our website.

If you would like to do more than just be a member, we are looking for support in one or two areas. If you think you may be able to help, please email 1memsec.fsoc@gmail.com or phone our Chairman, Alan Gavaghan on 01252 724714

David Howell

Chair of the Planning Committee

 

Architecture & Design Awards 2020

Award Certificate Watermark 2021

 

The Planning Committee have received a limited number of nominations for the Awards. Having sought agreement with the executive committee they have reluctantly decided to postpone the current Award cycle until 2021. When nominations are sought again the buildings nominated by the closing date of 31 January 2020 will be included. Nomination will be sought for buildings and schemes completed between September 2017 and January 2021. It is proposed that the deadline for nominations will be Monday 1 February 2021.

The Planning chair thanks members that nominated buildings or schemes and will contact them personally shortly.

 

Our programme

AGM 2019

2020 Programme

In response to the Covid-19 pandemic, the committee has decided to cancel all events until further notice. We are monitoring the situation to assess whether events can resume.

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