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Covid 19 and air pollution

Air pollution

Martin Luther University of Germany has studied correlation between Covid 19 and air pollution. The research indicates that long term exposure to NO² may be one of the most important contributors to fatality from Coronavirus.

Click here for further information about research

Click here for abstract of scientific paper

Although there is no causal link shown between air pollution and Covid 19, it is to be expected that people who have had long term exposure to high levels of NO²  will suffer from respiratory damage which is directly linked to greater risk from the disease.

NO² concentrations in central Farnham (as recorded at the automatic monitor at The Royal Deer crossroads) have fallen by around 50% since the lockdown commenced and are now at a very acceptable level of 16 µg/m³. Interestingly however, the Particulate Matter PM₁₀ readings have so far not changed, pointing to the fact that Particulate Matter is mostly the result of factors other than traffic and for Farnham are at levels well below UK government objectives (20 µg/m³ in Farnham compared with 40 µg/m³ government guidelines).

The diffusion tube NO²monitoring system run by Waverley BC has had to be suspended for the time being because of the current crisis.

 

Our programme

AGM 2019

2020 Talks Programme

Venue – St Joan’s Centre, Tilford Road, GU9 8DJ.

Time – Refreshments 7.30 for 8.00pm start

In response to the Coronavirus situation, the committee has decided to cancel all events for April, May and June.

September 28th, Monday

Charles ‘O” Brien – ‘Revising Pevsner: a new look at Surrey’ – The first full-scale revision and updating of the guide is now underway and its author, Charles O’Brien, joint series editor and author for the Pevsner Architectural Guides, will speak not only about the foundation and history of the series but also about Ian Nairn and the original Surrey volume.

He will also explain some of the challenges of fieldwork and the pressures that are brought to bear on selectivity for the gazetteer by the extent of research on buildings of all periods that has emerged since Pevsner and Nairn’s time. He will also speak in detail about Nairn’s descriptions of Farnham and its neighbourhood and some of the discoveries which have come to light in the course of the revision project.

October 19th, Monday

Chris Shepheard – “Farnham a contrast in Photos”- Based on a walking tour this presentation shows how the town has changed since the advent of photography through a mixture of 1980s colour slides and copies of old black and white photographs. The life of the town is shown from the earliest times with photographs of recent archaeological excavations, and the effects of world and national events such as wars and coronations right down to local carnivals. Amongst all this can be seen the everchanging townscape of buildings of which Farnham is justly proud.

Chris Shepheard was a Herald photographer for 29 years from 1971, also taking on the editing of Peeps into the Past during the 1990s. The latter is a role which he continues today after having recently retired as Director of the Rural Life Centre at Tilford. Many of the photographs which appear in this presentation have appeared in the Peeps column over the years and the archive continues to grow with contributions coming in from the public on an almost daily basis. He was born and has always lived in Farnham and is keenly interested learning more about and preserving the town’s heritage at the same time making that known to a wider audience.Chris is also a trustee of Farnham Castle, the vice-chairman of Farnham Visitors Forum and a joint organiser of the town’s popular annual walking festival.

November 13th, Friday

Robin Stannard – Historic Building Surveyor – Adams Architecture – Hugh Thackeray Turner – Westbrook – The talk not only considers Turner’s architecture work, but also his involvement with conservation through his role a Secretary of the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings (founded by William Morris). For example, in the West Surrey Area, Turner bought Witley Common then gave it to National Trust and he was heavily involved with the purchase of the Devils Punch Bowl, which was then also given to the National Trust. Turner’s architectural design was heavily influenced by his restoration work.

December 11th, Friday

Farnham Rep – Christmas Evening – Brenda Longman returns with her festive fun to make a Cracking Evening with seasonal verse both amusing and poignant, but always entertaining interspersed with the odd musical item. The Readings will be taken from the following authors Alex Hamiliton, P.G.Wodehouse, Pam Ayers, Gervase Phinn, Micheal Frayn, Charles Dickens. Cast Open to change owing to professional contracts.

By Social Secretary

Michelle Quinlan

 

Referendum on Neighbourhood Plan

Website Image

Residents of Farnham are urged to vote yes at the forthcoming referendum to decide whether Waverley Borough Council should use the Reviewed Farnham Neighbourhood Plan to determine the development strategy for Farnham on Thursday 12 March.

The Plan identifies a number of allocated sites across Farnham that will provide the required 2,780 homes for the Plan period up to 2032

Voting for our Plan would inhibit the loss of green fields around our town and prevent additional traffic congestion

Below are links to Farnham Town Council’s website page and Waverley Borough Council’s website page for the referendum

https://www.farnham.gov.uk/services/neighbourhood-plan/neighbourhood-plan-referendum-2020

https://www.waverley.gov.uk/info/200138/elections/2216/farnham_neighbourhood_plan_2013-2032_referendum

alternatively you can click on the following links for the Reviewed Farnham Neighbourhood Plan

and for the appendices    Appendix 2 Housing Sites

                                      Appendix 3 Land for Business

                                      Appendix 4 Neighbourhood Centres

Please email 1secretary.fsoc@gmail.com if you have any questions which we will try and answer.

At the referendum in May 2017 the plan received a 88% yes vote from 38% of the electorate.

Please let your family and friends living in Farnham know about the referendum and the critical importance of supporting the Plan

The Story of Global Warming

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On Friday 20 September Professor Ian Candy treated us to “The story of Global Warming from a scientist’s perspective”.

Climate change is a hot topic, with the Extinction Rebellion protests, the government’s 2050 Zero Emission law, Greta Thunberg’s school strikes and David Attenborough’s Blue Planet.

Ian has worked all over the world studying the causes and impact of climate change. In particular, he has focused on the periods of global warming in the past and the role of climate change in human evolution, dispersal and occupation. Ian will be outlining why climates vary and how the magniude of change we are experiencing is a truly unique crisis that will radically change our future.

Locally, Surrey has just launched the Surrey Climate Comission.

Click here for The Royal society’s overview of Climate Change causes.

Click here for The Royal Society’s 2014 flm in Climate Change.

 

Save Tice’s Meadow Nature Reserve

Tices Meadow

Tice’s Meadow is currently owned by Hanson, who propose to put it up for sale. This could jeopardise its future as a Nature Reserve. A petition has been started, to save the reserve.

Click here for link to petition

Our chairman, Alan Gavaghan, has written to Simon Willis, CEO of Hanson, expressing our views.

Dear Mr.Willis,

Tice’s Meadow Nature Resarve.

Our interest in the proposed sale of Tice’s Meadow Nature Reserve, has been recorded as a joint signatory in the letter sent to you by the Tice’s Meadow Bird Group dated the 21st. October.

It is felt that the concerns expressed in that letter to ensure the long term security of this highly successful and nationally applauded nature reserve should be strengthened by a further underlining of the wide spread local disquiet at the possibility that all the efforts of local volunteers could be destroyed should the ownership pass to a body disinterested in the continuation of this reserve.

Whilst it is appreciated that you have a commercial decision to reach, it is hoped that with the Hanson’s proven interest in securing this oasis of nature, then your laudable ambitions could be extended by requiring a purchaser to continue the trail you have blazed by accepting a minimum requirement not to impede the activities of the Tice’s Meadow Bird Group.

The Farnham Society was formed in1911 and has always been at the forefront of preserving what is beneficial for the local community but we do not enter lightly into any discussion unless it is felt that the core subject will have far reaching and adverse consequences.

Within the remit of your corporate responsibilities it would be appreciated if you could discuss this matter with your colleagues to see whether it is possible to negotiate an arrangement which will be commercially satisfactory and also continue into the future the protection which has been generously provided over the years by your own Group.

Yours sincerely,

Alan Gavaghan.

Chairman.

Click here for link to petition

Brightwells Films 2019

Brightwell films image 2019

                                

May 2019, three more films have now been released about the Brightwells Yard development. These films reflect thoughts and experiences from residents, consultants and shop owners one year after the start of construction. For full screen view of film, click on title rather than on ‘Play’ arrow.

We seek feedback, please email us with your views and thoughts about these films and the development on

farnhamfilms@gmail.com

Borelli Walk Update

Peter Bridgeman, retired arboricultural consultant, talks about the history and environmental importance of Borelli Walk, and the impact of the Brightwells Yard development, notably on biodiversity.

Questions are raised about the respect expected from the developer. Waverley Borough Council offer comments on the interview with Peter Bridgeman. Click here for link.

Impact on retailing in Farnham

Owners of independent shops give their mixed views on the likely impact of the commercial element of the new development. 

Debbie Flowerday, a highly regarded retail consultant, living in Farnham, gives her opinions on the possible interaction between the old and new areas in the town, and puts forward ideas regarding the relative merits of different types of shops.

Click here for link to film

Brightwells, impact on traffic

Robert Mansfield, local resident and internationally respected traffic engineer, explains  the impact of the Brightwells Yard development upon traffic in and around Farnham. Motorists give thier views on traffic congestion on the A31 during the construction of the temporary bridge. Views are offered on the likely congestion and parking issues in the town centre.

Click here for link to film.

Please email us with your views and thoughts about the films and the development, on

farnhamfilms@gmail.com

Our original June 2018 film on the Brightwells Yard development, is still available,

Click here to view.

 

 

Northbrook Park development

Northbrook plan

The East Hampshire District Council (EHDC) has published its Draft Local Plan (dLP) for consultation. The consultation started on 5 February and finished on Tuesday 19 March 2019. The dLP includes the provision of 3,723 homes required to satisfy its national housing allocation including an allocation at Northbrook Park which abuts the Surrey Hampshire boundary. The current proposal in Hampshire is the construction of a minimum of 800 houses, a primary school, community hub, ‘village’ centre, sports facilities and a variety of employment and office buildings. The dLP indicates that the development would if undertaken take place between 2028 and 2036.

Bentley Parish Council has expressed concerns at the proposals. Bentley residents attended a meeting at the Bentley Memorial Hall on Monday 25 February, an estimated four hundred people. The parish of Bentley currently has approximately 450 houses with a population of approximately 1,250.

The Society understands that the landowner’s proposals are to extend the development in the Farnham Built Up Boundary Area and construct a further 700 houses.

The Northbrook site was submitted as part of the Farnham Neighbourhood Plan process. The site was rejected, the summary stating ‘A significant development of 15.3ha set in open countryside removed from Farnham and extending beyond the Parish boundary into East Hampshire would have a significant detrimental effect on the landscape of high sensitivity.’ Continuing ‘A new settlement would not represent an appropriate strategy to accommodate development taking into account the reasonable alternative of brownfield sites in more sustainable locations. The site is unsuitable and potentially unachievable as a housing allocation.’

The impact on Bentley will be unmeasurable, but the impact on Farnham will be significant as well. Residents of the development would likely look to travel east to work, to shop, for their social life and entertainment.

Issues that would arise from the inclusion of the proposed development in the EHDC dLP to Farnham would include a significant impact on the infrastructure. If properly managed, the funds levied under the Community Infrastructure Levy (CIL) could contribute to a western relief road, which would be beneficial and would ease what could otherwise be not insignificant congestion through Farnham town centre. Increased traffic movements would undoubtedly result in some congestion and over demand for parking spaces despite the proposal to operate a bus service, with increased demand on already stretched facilities. Residents travelling to London would require to travel through the town centre, rail tickets are currently 20% cheaper from Farnham than Bentley.

The development would bring a further demand for school places. Farnham is already looking to have 2,780 new houses built in the period up to 2032, so even the 800 homes proposed on the Hampshire side would bring a significant extra demand. The further 700 homes in the Farnham boundary area would create even more demand.

The proposals would result in the loss of greenfields, an area recorded as landscape of high sensitivity. A development would change the A31 corridor immeasurably.

The Society is going to comment and register its concern and objection to the inclusion of the site within the EHDC dLP. Clicking this link will take you to the draft Local Plan.

You can comment on the dLP by clicking here, note that you will have to register to do so. Alternatively you can email your comments to localplan@easthants.gov.uk or write to Planning Policy, East Hampshire District Council, Penns Place, Petersfield, Hampshire, GU31 4EX. Your comments need to be received by the council by 5pm on Tuesday 19 March 2019.

Evening Talk: Harold Falkner, more than an Arts and Crafts Architect

Harold Falkner book cover image

FALKNER AND BORELLI – MEN WHO CHANGED FARNHAM

In 1911 The Farnham Society was founded by the Bishop of Winchester (Lord of Farnham Castle), Charles Borelli and Harold Falkner – two men who had grown up in Farnham and put Farnham at the centre of their lives. During the first half of the twentieth century they dominated the town scene.

Charles Ernest Borelli came from a family of Italian clockmakers who had first come to England in 1820 and settled in Farnham. He was born in 1873 at number 48 Castle Street.

Harold Falknerwas born in 1875, to a family which had been farming at Dippenhall from the 1750’s. When he was aged eight his mother moved back to Farnham to live at 24 West Street where he spent the rest of his life – another 80 years.

Both went to Farnham Grammar School as boys, then on to the Farnham Art School run by W H Allen who inspired his pupils with an interest in art and architecture but especially the Arts and Crafts movement.

After their early education Borelli joined the family business of clocks, and Falkner trained to be an architect.

In their twenties Borelli and Falkner were close friends – both participating members of Farnham Football Club and Farnham Hockey Club, and joint secretaries of the new swimming baths in 1897. Neither married.

Charles Borelli was elected to Farnham Urban District Council in 1906, becoming chairman in 1910, and remained an elected member until his death in 1950.

Harold Falkner might have gone on, like Edwin Lutyens (six years older than him but also a local man) to become a London architect, but Harold never wanted to leave Farnham.

Borelli’s particular passion was for trees – in the centre of town none were allowed to be cut down without his say-so. He was involved in the 1909 conversion of Gostrey Meadow, formerly a Victorian rubbish dump, into a fine open space with fine trees. In architecture he favoured shopfronts in the Georgian style but relied on Falkner for professional advice. Falkner’s advice was crucial, but it would not have got far without the financial and political muscle of Borelli, who could charm property owners into following his ideas.

In the centre of town Borelli purchased several properties – an old pub, the old Town Hall, and several shops in West Street – and got Falkner to re-build, which he did with skill and respect for their Tudor and Stuart elements.

Falkner was also involved in the development of the suburbs of Farnham, especially the Great Austins area, south of the railway station. Initially he concentrated on houses in the Arts and Crafts style, later changing to mansions in Queen Anne style. He also built some remarkable houses in Dippenhall.

When he died in 1963 he left his house to The Farnham Society, which it sold to Surrey County Council. A collection of his drawings found in the house is now in Farnham Museum.

Thanks to Borelli and Falkner the town is not just a neo-Georgian gem but has the added spice of medieval, Tudor, and Arts and Crafts buildings.