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Appeal Update

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Decisions on planning appeals relating to Waverley Lane, Lower Weybourne Lane and Bilton House, Monkton Lane are due to be published by the Secretary of State’s office no later than 13 September. The hope is that all will be dismissed following the making or adoption of the Farnham Neighbourhood Plan on 28 July 2017.

Appeals relating to 35 Frensham Vale and Lavender Lane, Rowledge were dismissed in July, citing the Neighbourhood Plan. A decision is now awaited for Knowle Farm, 19 Old Park Lane, the deadline for written submissions having ended on 28 July, but this could be between six weeks and three months.

The Hamlet in the Woods (Land at Frensham Vale) appeal has been withdrawn. The Folly Hill appeal is due to be heard at a Public Inquiry on 14 November 2017

 

Farnham Neighbourhood Plan adopted on 28 July

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JUDICIAL REVIEW DISMISSED SO PLAN ADOPTED

Waverley Borough Council ‘made’ or adopted the Farnham Neighbourhood Plan on Friday 28 July after a judicial review challenge, mounted by developers, was rejected in a decision handed down on Tuesday 18 July.

In the referendum held on Thursday 4 May 2017, 88% of votes cast were in support of the Farnham Neighbourhood Plan.

WBC has now implemented the Plan as part of its policy.

The Neighbourhood Plan, prepared through consultation with residents and businesses in Farnham over a four year period, provides a vision for Farnham and guides the future growth of the town and its surrounding countryside for the period up to 2031.

There are 32 policies that will support the vision guiding and controlling development within the area covered by the Plan, including sites identified for housing and business development. Page 5 of the Plan has a map showing the designated area.

Since the decision by Mrs Justice Lang, two planning appeals for housing developments at 35 Frensham Vale and Lavender Lane, Rowledge have been dismissed, citing the Plan which is now being given ‘very significant weight’ by planning inspectors.

Click here for a link to the May 2017 Farnham Neighbourhood Plan document,

 

Waverley Local Plan update

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The Examination in Public of the Waverley Borough Council Local Plan took place over a six day period, starting on Tuesday 27 June, in the Council Chamber, the Burys, Godalming GU7 1HR.

The Inspector Jonathan Bore did not accept any diversion, cutting off those giving evidence if they wandered off topic. The most significant change is an increase in the number of houses that Waverley Borough Council are required to supply – from 519 to 590 dwellings per annum, including ‘taking’ 50% of Woking’s unmet housing need.

Waverley are now required to submit a bundle of documents clarifying and expanding upon the issues raised during the hearing. The hearing is over but the Examination continues. Waverley will be required to enter a further Public Consultation which is expected to start sometime in August, no date available yet.

Further details can be found on Waverley Borough Council’s website.

Waverley Lane planning inquiry update July 2017

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Waverley Lane, Farnham, Planning Inquiry Update July 2017

The Secretary of State’s office have sought responses to events, cases and information submitted by interested parties since April, including the Waverley Local Plan EiP, judicial review hearing and decision, and court cases decisions related to similar circumstances. The latest date advised by his office by which a decision will be made is 13 September 2017.

Previous website posting below

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The Public Inquiry Appeal by Wates Development Ltd against Waverley’s refusal of their planning application for 157 dwellings on the fields in Waverley Lane started on Tuesday 16 August 2016, and the first session lasted until Tuesday 23 August when the hearing was adjourned. The hearing was reconvened on Tuesday 18 October, the second session and hearing closing on Thursday 20 October. Wates withdrew the two supplementary applications but appealed the first and main application which received 1,192 objections.

The appeal was ‘recovered’, the planning term for the Secretary of State (SoS) calling in the final decision, after the Farnham Neighbourhood Plan was found to meet the basic conditions for Neighbourhood Plans on 22 February 2017. With recorded appeals the Inspector makes a recommendation but the SoS’s office will decide whether they will allow the appeal.

On 17 March the SoS’s office informed Waverley and Wates that they had until 31 March 2017 to submit representation to them resulting from the Farnham Neighbourhood Plan being found to meet the conditions and going to referendum on 4 May.

The Inquiry Hearing between 16 August and 23 August was well attended by residents. Thank you if you attended. The Inspector does record residents’ interest in the appeal. Independent Ward Councillor Andy MacLeod participated during the Appeal Hearing particularly on the question of the Five Year Housing Land Supply and the fact that the delivery of houses is by housing developers not Waverley. South Farnham Residents’ Association (SOFRA) questioned several of Wates’ consultants called to provide evidence and the Bourne Conservation Group and Peter Bridgeman gave evidence to support the defence of the Appeal.

Our Next Talk

Ethel Smyth photo

 

Venue :

St Joan’s Centre, Tilford Road, Farnham, GU9 8DJ

Monday 25 September

Dame Ethel Smyth, 1858 – 1944, Composer, Writer , Suffragette and Frimley Resident.

Our speaker: Dr Christopher Wiley, Senior Music Lecturer, University of Surrey.

Photograph by George Grantham Bain Collection; Restored by Adam Cuerden [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

SCC Recycling Centres

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Surrey County Council is proposing further cuts to the service provided by the Community Recycling Centres (CRCs) known as dumps or tips.

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The planned cuts involve closing all Surrey CRCs on two days a week, permanently shutting four centres (Bagshot, Cranleigh, Dorking and Warlingham), scrapping the free daily allowance of one bag of non-household rubbish and making anyone visiting the Farnham and Camberley centres prove that they live in Surrey.

In addition, anyone driving a van, trailer or pick-up truck will have to use larger CRCs only.

The council has run a public consultation on the proposals, the closing date was 7 August .

The council says that changes are being proposed in order to save money because of “continued cuts to funding, rising costs and increasing demand for key services” which mean that the council must make savings of more than £100m this year. 

Visit to Heath Robinson Museum and London Museum of Water and Steam

Heath Robinson Museum and West House

Heath Robinson Museum and West House

William Heath Robinson (1872 – 1944) is an artist renowned for his cartoons of weird inventions. The Heath Robinson Museum, which recently moved to a new building in Pinner (north west London) explores this and other sides of his work.

Having trained as an artist, he sought to pursue landscape painting. However the need to earn a living led him to join his brothers Charles and Tom in a book illustration business. His output covered Shakespeare, contemporary writers such as Kipling, and children’s books, extending to high qulaity magzines such as Tatler. The humorous side of his work can be seen, for example in satirising GF Watts.

Tatler Love and Time image

The First World War brought shortages which affected the publishing industry, and Heath Robinson focussed on his humorous cartoons, contributing to the war effort with bizarre ideas for battlefield tactics.

The museum opened in 2016, in a new building in Pinner Memorial Park, alongside the Georgian West House. Beyond the park is Pinner village, with 16th century buildings lining the mainstreet, which leads up to the 14th century church at the top.

The afternoon took us to the London Museum fo Water and Steam for a guided tour. The museum is located in the 19th century pumping station at Kew, on the north side of the Thames. The site dates from the 1830s, though its origins go back to the early 19th century and the need to supply water both for the canals and for the population of London.

A section on water supply traced the history back to the 16th century, with the use of wooden water pipes – elm was a favoured material. A water main was formed by boring a hole along the length of a tree trunk – hence the names ‘trunk’ and ‘branch’ for main and secondary service lines. Wooden pipes were superceded by iron piping during the 19th century.

The Kew pumping station housed a number of steam engines, together capable of pumping several million gallons per day. Diesel powered pumps were introduced during the 20th century, though the steam pumps were retained as a backup until WWII. Electric pumps were introduced post war.

Several of the steam engines have been restored.The museum also houses various engines brought in from other sites. One engine is run in steam each weekend – fuel costs prevent more frequent operation. On the day of our visit, it was the turn of the Easton and Amos engine. Built on 1863, it had operated at a waterworks in Northampton until 1930.

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For further information, visit

heathrobinsonmuseum.org

www.waterandsteam.org.uk

Love and Time’ image courtesy of Heath Robinson Museum.

Amenity Awards 2017

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TFS_Logo       THE FARNHAM SOCIETY

Nomination for Amenity Awards 2017

The purpose of the Awards is to ‘encourage and stimulate architects, developers and contractors to undertake the highest level of design and workmanship in preserving and improving existing buildings and in new buildings.’

Nominations will be judged on a selection of the following criteria:

Contemporary

Sympathetic to and integrates well with existing buildings

Designed for its location and fulfils its purpose

Environmentally sustainable

There will be three levels of achievement:

Exceptional

Highly commended

Commended

In 2015 The Farnham Society presented Amenity Awards to the following buildings or schemes for outstanding design.

 
    DanielHallAmenityAward           ForgeAmenityAward

Daniel Hall                                                               The Forge, Upper Church Lane (Plaque)                                                                   (Highly Commended)

    SweetShoppeAmentiyAwards          PotteryAmenityAwards

Mr Simms Olde Sweet Shoppe, Downing St                 Farnham Pottery         (Plaque)                                                                     (Highly Commended)

This year we are asking The Farnham Society members to nominate buildings or a scheme that they consider are worthy of one of these awards.

If you would like to nominate one building or scheme please do so, on the website, by returning the form that can be printed off the website – click here to download - or by completing the form which was included in AGM pack to the address below. Alternatively, complete the form at the bottom of this page.

The buildings or schemes must be within the Farnham Town Council boundary, completed between June 2015 and August 2017 and be visible from an accessible road, footpath or space. One nomination per person

The deadline for nominations is Friday 25 August 2017

Award certificates and plaques will be presented at the 2018 AGM

The Planning Committee have, in discussion, proposed for example, the following two for the shortlist:

    WeydonAmenityAwards      GuildofrdRoadAmenityAwards

Medici Building at Weydon School       Housing development on Guildford Road

Postal address for nominations The Farnham Society c/o 13 Lickfolds Road, Rowledge, Farnham, GU10 4AF

The Farnham Society
Nomination for Amenity Awards 2017

I would like to nominate the following building or scheme for The Farnham Society’s 2017 Amenity Awards:

Building

Address

Your Name (required)

Your Email (required)

Your Message

Visit to Sandhurst

By WyrdLight,com 
CC BY 3.0

By WyrdLight,com CC BY 3.0

Royal Military Academy Sandhurst and St Michael’s Abbey Farnborough

Wednesday, 24th May 2017

We started with a morning visit to the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst which is where all officers in the British Army are trained to take on the responsibilities of leading the soldiers under their command. There was a guided tour of the Academy which will include coffee.

After a stop for lunch the visit continued to St Michael’s Abbey, Farnborough.

Following the fall of the Second French Empire in 1870 Napoleon III, his wife Empress Eugenie and their son, the Prince Imperial, were exiled from France and took up residence in England. Following the death of first her husband and later her son the distraught Empress decided to found an abbey as a mausoleum for her family. All three now rest in granite sarcophagi, provided by Queen Victoria, in the Abbey church.

Photo by WyrdLight.com, CC BY 3.0

Judicial Review judgement handed down

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In the judgement from the preliminary hearing on 31 January, Mr Justice Dove ruled that the five claimants did not have the necessary standing to take Waverley Borough Council (WBC) to Judicial Review over management of the East Street / Brightwells development contract.

His reasoning was that a retendering of the scheme would not result in a development different to that currently proposed.

Click here to see full judgement

WBC  stated at the meeting in May 2016 that it was for the courts to decide upon the legality of the changes which they made to the development contract. WBC have prevented the courts from judging whether they have acted lawfully.

 

 

Brightwells model

Brightwells development seen from The Woolmead

Brightwells development seen from The Woolmead

The Farnham Society has constructed scale models of the Brightwells development from the architectural plans posted on the Waverley website. It demonstrates the sizes of the buildings and shows how they would dominate the surrounding part of the town.

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In an early version of the model, the largest building, designated D8, shows detailed appearance, while other buildings are shown in block form to illustrate their approximate size. D8 is top right in the picture above, and covers most of the Dogflud car park. It is a four storey ‘plus’ block, and would be the largest building in Farnham. The block is to house the cinema, shops and apartments, providing car parking on all levels of the building including lower ground level. The picture below illustrates its height relative to Brightwell House. It shows how the space on the south side of the house is dominated by the new tall buildings, to the detriment of the house.

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This central area is accessed by narrow alleyways, the picture below shows the approach from the existing sports centre.

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Likewise, the new Town Square, on the left hand side of Brightwell House in the picture below, is surrounded by high buildings and most of it will be in shadow for parts of the day.

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A later version of the model shows the proposed blocks in more detail.  The existing Brightwell House is shown in orange, and the model demonstrates clearly how it is dwarfed by the new blocks.

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Model Image 10.17

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The scale model presents a very different impression to that created by the Fly Through on the Waverley website. We have in the past wondered why Waverley have never produced a model of the scheme. We can now see why, having studied our own model.
After a photograph of the model was published in The Farnham Herald (week of 30 September 2106), various comments were made via Facebook:
John Spackman
September 29 at 11:40am
• Model depicts objectors’ fears
The Farnham Herald, Thursday 29th September 2016
Judi Fisher, Yolande Hesse and 6 others

Liam O’Reilly Where can I view this model David Howell?
Like · Reply · September 29 at 11:46am

Ben Shepherd So the picture look nothing like the model. What a surprise. We all love a bit of spin.

John Spackman • Planning Applications WA/2008/0279

http://planning.waverley.gov.uk/…/(RefNoLU)/WA20080279…

• D8 – East Elevation

http://www.waverley.gov.uk/…/WA2…/13512%20TPN-D8-050.pdf

• D8 – North Elevation

http://www.waverley.gov.uk/…/WA2…/13512%20TPN-D8-051.pdf

• D8 – South Elevation

http://www.waverley.gov.uk/…/WA2…/13512%20TPN-D8-052.pdf

• D8 – West Elevation

http://www.waverley.gov.uk/…/WA2…/13512%20TPN-D8-053.pdf

• D8 – Sectional Elevation 01

http://www.waverley.gov.uk/…/WA2…/13512%20TPN-D8-054.pdf

• D8 – Sectional Elevation 02

http://www.waverley.gov.uk/…/WA2…/13512%20TPN-D8-055.pdf

• D8 – Strip Elevations 01

http://www.waverley.gov.uk/…/13512%20TPN-D12-056.pdf

• D8 – Strip Elevations 02

http://www.waverley.gov.uk/…/13512%20TPN-D12-057.pdf

• D8 – Strip Elevations 03

http://www.waverley.gov.uk/…/WA2…/13512%20TPN-D8-058.pdf

• D8 – Strip Elevations 04

http://www.waverley.gov.uk/…/WA2…/13512%20TPN-D8-059.pdf

• D8 – Elevation in Context

http://www.waverley.gov.uk/…/WA2…/13512%20TPN-D8-060.pdf

Liam O’Reilly I assume the model was constructed be viewed by the public to convince people of the problem rather than to be viewed in private by a select few. I’d like to see it to understand the problem. Are there plans to display it publicly?

John Spackman • Magnified photograph of “The model showing Brightwell House ‘swamped’ by the new development”

Liam O’Reilly The model looks great. Is there somewhere we can view it?

Malcolm Bond Sorry, but this is an inappropriate monolith, completely unsuited to the plot size, and to Brightwells House, and, moreover, completely destroys Brightwells Gardens..

Martin Gardiner Crest removed all the nice bits, and Farnham picked up the tab.
Heads should roll.

Neil Farnham-Smith Shame the photo they published didn’t include the sports centre. I think that will shock people most about how different things will be.

Liam O’Reilly Why not make the model public? What’s the point of it if the people of Farnham can’t see it?

Martin Gardiner What I don’t understand is how WBC have the gall to leave that increasingly-misleading fly-through video on their website.
You would have to be quite foolish to believe it.

Liam O’Reilly No plans to allow the public to see this accurate model then?